Home

Sitemap

Contact Us


Become a Sensual lover

Erotic Technique

Health in Marriage

Basis of Sexual Relationships

Stress V/S Sex

Physical fitness and Safer Sex

Love making Techniques

Human Anatomy

Zeroing Postures

Pregnancy

Heart -Throbbing Positions

Sex Questions and Answers

BASIS OF SEXUL A RELATIONSHIPS

Very often some remarkably simply change in the way of living can result in substantial improvement in the mental or emotional health of the person who is basically stable. Even thirty minutes' additional rest in the period of twenty-four hours may make a person less irritable, friendlier, and therefore easier to get along with. This is especially apt to be so if the additional rest is secured in the form of one or two periods of physical relaxation or sleep during the daytime.
            Eating a better breakfast or an earlier dinner may help greatly in preventing fatigue and irritability. This is especially true in those person who tend to have low blood sugar levels. A great many tensions in the normal person can be traced directly to fatigue and undernourishment. A good starting point for mental health is to see in that you get adequate rest and good food.
            Mental health for the person in good physical fitness with reasonably adequate health habits is largely a problem in human sex  relations.
            To understand other people and to know that they have precisely the same emotional needs that you have is probably the most fundamental step toward both the maintenance of good mental health in yourself and the creation of sound emotional development in others.
            When people understand which emotional needs are fundamental and when they realize the destructive psychological effects of deficiencies in emotional experiences upon the personalities, it can be expected that the normal person will have a greater opportunity for a stable and emotionally rich life.

The Need for a sense of Security

For emotional stability a person must have a reasonable sense of security.
            When worries, tensions, fears and anxieties plague a person, it should be obvious that his emotional stability will be affected. Research has shown that anxiety, for example, may have profound influences on both the physical and mental status of the individual.
            One of the harmful effects of anxiety lies in its impairment of the power to reason. One psychiatrist who studied, for a period of several years, a large group of patients suffering form anxiety found that in almost all cases it was more difficult for these persons to solve problems whenever they were in a state of acute anxiety. Perhaps even more significant was his discovery that about 10 percent of the patients suffered from utter and complete destruction of the power to reason. About one person in ten in this group of patients was unable to do one person in ten in this group of patients was unable to do any effective reasoning at all while suffering from acute anxiety, although during a period of calm these same patents could work all the problems in reasoning given to them by the psychiatrist.
            Such research is very important, for it tells us that the patient who is insecure and anxious cannot think as well as the person who feels secure and serene.
            A sense of insecurity and anxiety can spread from one person to another. In one interesting experiment a group of psychiatrists listened to recordings made of patients suffering from acute anxiety. After the records had been played the psychiatrists themselves were in a state of anxiety. Other studies as well as practical experience tell us that anxiety is a communicable diseases. In fact, some psychiatrists believe that it should be classified among the communicable diseases by public health authorities.
            A group of psychiatrists in making studies of anxiety found that it primarily spread from one person to another through sound. So far as practical human situations are concerned this means that anxiety will spread from one person to another mostly through speech. To establish a sense of security in someone else, attention should be give to the quality of the voice. The person who learns voice modulation may be making a considerable contribution to the reduction of family tensions and quarrels. Almost everyone knows that when a person elevates his voice in anger, there is apt to be instant transmission of tension to another. Most likely that person's voice then climbs higher, and tension is transmitted back again to the other person. Such shuffling of anxiety builds tensions and makes it difficult or impossible to settle any quarrel through the use of reason.

The Need to Be Loved

            The need for affection is basic and universal among all people of all races and at all ages.
            Most people need to develop the capacity for expressing affection. With small children it is a relatively simply procedure to embrace them or tell them frankly that you love them. At the college level the problem is more complicated. Affection from friend takes the form of liking rather than outright sensual love. In other words, we need to have the fooling that we have friends who like us. To be deprived of friends is to be deprived of a mature form of affection. It is easy to make friends. All you have to do is be nice to people, be considerate of them, recognize their goods qualities, overlook their bad habits, be modest about your own accomplishments, and smile and be cheerful when you are with others.
            Many people have a genuine liking for their friends, but fail to let them know about it. Often one member of a family may have a deep and genuine lovemaking for the other members of the family, but may fail to indicate this in any way whatsoever.
            This is a mistake. Since people have a basic emotional need for the regard of others, we should let them know about it when we do like them.
            People who are shy or have a deep reserve may find it most difficult to come out of their shells to express an emotion. It can be done, however, for there are hundred and even thousands of different ways of expressing regard or affection for others.
            A friendly smile, a world of approbations, a part on the back, a friendly wink, an expression of courteous attention, depriving oneself of a privilege in favor of another are all ways of saying, "I like you" or "I love you."
            The important thing for people to remember when they have a difficult time showing any emotion is that the other person needs that expression of liking or regard in order to achieve a normal and wholesome level of mental health. In other words, when you express yourself, you are actually serving others rather than exposing yourself. People who are reluctant to express their inner feelings are not only depriving themselves of many friends, but are also overlooking opportunities for contributing to the welfare of others. This is a mistake that you ought not to make.

The Need for Independence

            The psychological structure of the human being is such that he is such that he is happiest when he has independence.
            Independence, however, must be couple with respect and consideration for others. The most effective kind of independence is that which supports the emotional need of the individual without taking from others their instinctive right to be independent.
            Independence should not be granted indiscriminately. It should be gauged to the capacity and maturity of the individual. It should be associated with a sense of responsibility. Independence without a sense of responsibility is essentially a form of license. When responsibility is associated with independence, the latter is freedom rather than license.
            Independence, then, carries with it responsibilities for the intelligent use of that freedom. Until people are mature enough to understand that the achievement of independence must be linked with the development of social responsibilities for the good of all, there will be evidence that the capacity for independence has not yet been adequately developed.
            To shelter a child from harmful influences is a responsibility of parenthood. To extend this protection into a long lasting overprotection is psychologic disservice to the individual. The parent who overprotects a child or young adult for fear that the individual will make a mistake is actually destroying, or at least hindering, development of the capacity to do the right thing.
            Every parent should have a deliberate program to yield independence to his or her children. In the long run it pays dividends of happiness for all members of the family.

NEXT