SEX HERBS-BETHA

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The Wonderful World  of Herbs

1.What Is an Herb?

 2.How to Choose and Use Herbs

Herbs to Improve Your Sex Life

 3.Increasing Your Sexual Desire and Drive

 4.Increasing Your Sexual Pleasure

 5.Relieving Male Menopause, Prostate Problems, and Impotence

 6.Relieving Female Menopause and Premenstrual Syndrome

 7.Controlling Health Conditions that Affect Sex

 8.Improving Your Overall Well-Being

 9.Sex Herb Combinations

 

Increasing your Sexual Desire And Drive

The word “libido” isn’t used now as much as it was in the heyday of Freudian psychology.  But its  definition still aptly describes “sexual desire.”  One dictionary puts it this  way:  “The psychic and emotional energy associated with bodily drives.”  Another dictionary adds that  these  “bodily drives” arising from “primitive urges” are usually  “goal-oriented.”   Now, what  could that mean when   we’re talking about sex herb combinations?   In this chapter   our goal is to focus on sexual desire and drive, which  are inextricably connected.

The sexual drive is perhaps the most  fascinating of all the “bodily drives.”  True, its original purpose  may have been ensure the continuation of humankind.  But the concept of procreation probably ranks much lower  on most  of our  scales than a desire for  plain “old –fashioned” sexual enjoyment.

But if you don’t have the urge – the libido or desire or derive – then you may not be having sex as often as you would like.  Or, lack of sexual  drive can turn   sex into more of a chore than a increasing your sexual pleasure.  it doesn’t  have to be that way.  The herbs  described  in this chapter can help put sexual desire and drive back into your life – or back into the  life of the person you  love.

Anise and Star Anise

Pimpinella anisum

Anise is native to the Eastern  Mediterranean areas, Eurasia, and Africa.  There are approximately 150 different species of anise.  All are no-table for their feathery leaves and small white  or yellow flowers, as well as  their licorice-like  aroma and taste.

The basics of Anise

Anise has a the wonderful world  of herbs rich history – and a significant one, it appears, as it is considered  to be one of the oldest medicinal herbs.  In biblical times,  Anise was actually one of the spices  that folks  used to pay their taxes.  The Romans  also found good uses for anise, including eating spice cake  that included anise  as one of its main ingredients.  This cake was eaten  after a meal  to promote good digestion  and eliminate indigestion.

Anise  is still an  extremely popular an herb, not only for medicinal purposes, but  also for its  wide use as a flavoring agent  or spice.  It is  often found in commercially prepared cough medications and throat lozenges.  It is also used as an antiseptic in some brands  of mouth-wash and toothpaste.

It has been shown that many  women with a higher level of female sex hormones experiences  increased sexual desire or even   more profound heights  or sexual intensity  and satisfaction.  Anise  imitates the female hormone, estrogen.  This may  explain why  anise has been  used as a  sexual stimulant for woman.  There are reports,  too, that some men  using anise  have experienced a more satisfying too, that some men using anise  have experienced  a more satisfying  sex life.

Anise  itself has not been formally studied  for its effects on sexual  stimulation.   However, it is  generally  accepted  that anethole, an ingredient of anise, does have  mild  estrogenic effects.

  New Mexican Pumpkin Bread

This has always  been a Roybal family favorite.  Maybe  now we understand  why!  This recipe   produces four  loaves of mildly sweet  bread.  Try it toasted with butter for a satisfying treat or side dish.

            7 cups  all-purpose flour           ¾ -1 cup pumpkin (canned or fresh  cooked)
            1 tablespoon salt                       1 tablespoon anise seed
            2/3 cup sugar                            ¾  cups warm water
            2 eggs                                      2 packages of yeast
            ¼  cup oil

Mix flour, salt, and sugar.  Cut in oil.   Beat eggs slightly and add.  Add pumpkin.  Dissolve  yeast  in water and add to mixture.  And anise seed.  The bread  dough will be somewhat  sticky- don’t add in extra  flour unless it’s actually soggy.

Let rise two  hours.  Punch  down and knead  slightly.   Let rise 45 minutes.  Punch down, shape, and place in oiled pans.  Let rise until doubled in bulk.  Bake at 400ºF for  20-35 minutes.  Check frequently after 20 minutes.  It’s  done when the top is slightly browned and the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.

Parts used

The fruit (seeds) of the anise  plant are used for medicinal purposes.

Chemical content

Anise  is high in anethole, a compound with effects similar to estrogen, a female sex hormone.

Dosing instructions and availability

Anise seed are readily available in the spice sections of grocery stores.  You may also find it as  an ingredient in many food products.   You can even find it in some herbal teas.  The liqueur  anisette also contains anise.  The best  way to use  anise  is to add it to recipes  for baked goods and desserts.  Anise oil is also available.  Follow the labeling instructions carefully.

Cautions

Anise is considered safe when used for food.  Anise oil can cause vomiting and seizures, so limit use to less than a teaspoon per day.  Pregnant women should  limit  anise  to food use only, since its estrogenic effects  could cause uterine contractions.  Allergic reactions to anethole include redness and blistering with topical  use or gastrointestinal distress when anise is eaten.

Added benefits

  • May aid iron absorption
  • Aids digestion
  • Eases respirator conditions, including asthma and sinusitis, by helping  the body to clear mucus  form airway
  • Repels insects
  • Helps  to relieve menopausal symptoms
  • Promotes the production of breast  milk  in nursing mothers